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Bikes
13.27.03
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Dixon Carbon RX
Designed for a more dedicated rider a pack that transforms the Dixon into a racing machine ready to take off on an endurance race or a marathon downhill.
Dixon Carbon RX
Designed for a more dedicated rider a pack that transforms the Dixon into a racing machine ready to take off on an endurance race or a marathon downhill.
Ride it magazine
Formula one
New Wave | Devinci Devinci has built its reputation on its aluminum frames, which are manufactured at a facility in Chicoutimi, Quebec. The brand is likely to take the lead in carbon bikes in 2013, since the flagship models of ‘hardcore’ bikes (all mountain, endurance and downhill) are broken down into composite parts that are produced in Taiwan, a world leader in bike production. Although Devinci is subcontracting manufacturing, the company’s own technology and designs are used, called DMC for Devinci Monocoque Carbon. cross-hatched and unidirectional carbon fiber layers, bolstered by high-strength epoxy resins and finished with a blast of Nano powder additive.. Only the bases are aluminum, for reliability and resistance against spray and rocks. The Dixon carbon version is almost 300 g lighter than the aluminum version. It definitely has everything you could want in terms of modern ATV all-mountain features: a conical head tube with a semi-integrated headset, a 12x142 mm rear axle, integrated ball bearing system (Press Fit BB92) and ISCG support for the guide rollers with interchangeable inserts in case of problems.

Homegrown Design
In terms of design, Devinci has made some minor changes in 2013; Dixon will feature a slightly longer top tube. The geometry can be altered in two positions (upper and lower) using the inserts located on the inner part of the junction between the stays and the rods. This provides a 0.5° clearance at the angles (66,2° or 66,7° for the steering angle) and 6 mm at the level of the height of the bottom bracket (354 mm or 360 mm). This is the lower position that is finally in line with the RX option that Dixon will feature in 2013. Kezako is a frame designed for a more dedicated rider a pack that transforms the Dixon into a racing machine ready to take off on an endurance race or a marathon downhill. Devinci integrated a Fox Talas 34 fork with a 160 mm travel, a pin, a RockShox Reverb telescopic seat post, 50 mm Eaton Haven gears and large 780 mm Truvativ Boobar handlebars.

Formula 1
Is this RX assembly truly designed for hardcore riders? In fact, it is. Above all, it strengthens Dixon’s reputation. Assembling a fork with a 160 mm clearance makes it possible to increase stability by opening up the steering angle. The new Fox 34 is the ideal kit for endurance. More durable than the 32 and less extreme than the 36, it features an exemplary manoeuvring position although we find the Talas fork to be limited. Remaining in the Trail position (the intermediate CTD position), it features a very good reading of the ground and we find it less likely to “eat up” the travel compared to Float the previous model Float. As for the Dave Weagle split pivot, we have already had the chance to confirm that it is one of the highest performing rear suspension systems on the market. This impression was confirmed on the Dixon Carbon in terms for pedalling performance and grip on rough, steep terrain. Although it has less than 150 mm clearance, this Dixon performs better than many allegedly superior endurance bikes. The Dixon performs incredibly at each restart and demonstrates surprising manoeuvrability, with shorter bases compared to others models in the category. The stability of the fast bits is impressive, which are tightly secured to the handlebars, as with large downhill racers. With a super clean frame and suspensions that show their full potential at high speeds, the bike has the perfect combination of meticulous designs. One might say that Dixon doesn’t do leisurely rides. It can be compared to a Formula 1 car, a machine designed for performance, which can be demanding. It requires you to be highly skilled and in excellent physical condition in order to take full advantage of the bike.
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